Archive for November 2008

Raymond Manalo

November 24, 2008

I stumbled on this article at 8:30 a.m. today. This story is scary enough to be a horror novel. And why the heck is this posted under OPINION?

 

Read on and be horrified. If these unscrupulous people can do this to a Bulakeno, I can’t grasp the more unimaginable events happening in far-flung areas of the Philippines.

 

Rebel without a clue
Rage

By Patricia Evangelista
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 02:06:00 11/23/2008

THIS is the story of one Raymond Manalo, farmer, who disappeared on Feb. 14, 2006 with his older brother from their farm in San Ildefonso, Bulacan. Manalo was neither activist nor rebel when he disappeared. He escaped more than two years later. He says there are many, many more like him.

* * *

They put you in a cage four feet by one foot small, the height of an average man. There are hollow blocks to the side and iron grills in front. You sit with three other men, crouched in a line. There is no other way to fit.

Your brother is in the same cell. The door opens, more of them come in. More of them like you—beaten, bruised, helpless. They are put inside the next cell. This time there are two men and a married couple. The woman has burns all over her body. She was raped, they tell you. She was raped and beaten until she soiled herself. They say she has gone mad. They take her away.

This is where you shit, where you piss, where you wash if you still care. You do not feel the wind; you do not see the sun. Your food comes rarely, and what comes is rotten, leftover pig feed. Three men arrive, from Nueva Ecija. They are tortured. One of them has both arms broken. Bleeding.

Sometimes, when the soldiers are drinking, they take you out of your cage and play with you. The game varies, but it is usually the same. Two by fours, chains, an open gardening hose shoved down your nose. You crawl back to your cage, on your hands and knees. You wake up to screaming, to the sound of grown men begging, and you wonder which one it is this time. Sometimes, one of your cellmates will disappear. Sometimes, they don’t come back.

Then they take you away, and there is a doctor, pills, antibiotics, a bed. They tell you they are taking you home to see your parents. You meet the man they call The Butcher, and he tells you to tell your parents not to join the rallies, to stay away from human rights groups, that they would ruin your life and your brother’s. He tells you, this small man in shorts, that if you can only prove you’re on his side now, he would let you and your brother live. He gives you a box of vitamins, and tells you that they are expensive: P35 per pill.

They put a chain around your waist. The military surround your farm. Your mother opens the front door crying, and hugs you. You tell them what you were told to say. You hand them the money Palparan told you to give. Then you are told you must go.

Always, you keep thinking of escape. You make yourself useful, to make them trust you. You cook. You wash cars. You clean. You shop. No task is too menial. And one day, while you sweep the floor, you see a young woman, chained to the foot of a bed. Her name is Sherlyn Cadapan, she tells you, Sports Science, University of the Philippines Diliman, the same Sherlyn who disappeared from Hagonoy, Bulacan on June 26, 2006. She says she has been raped.

Later, you meet Karen Empeño, also from UP, and Manuel Merino, the farmer who rushed to save the two girls when they were abducted. Karen and Sherlyn are in charge of washing the soldiers’ clothes, you and Manuel and your brother Reynaldo wash the car and carry water and cook.

The five of you are taken from camp to camp. You see the soldiers stealing from villagers. You see them bringing in blindfolded captives. You see them digging graves. You see them burning bodies, pouring gasoline as the fire rose. You see them shoot old men sitting on carabaos and see them push bodies into ravines. And in April 2007, you hear a woman begging, and when you are ordered to fix dinner, you see Sherlyn, lying naked on a chair that had fallen on the floor, both wrists and one tied leg propped up.

You see them hit her with wooden planks, see her electrocuted, beaten, half-drowned. You see them amuse themselves with her body, poke sticks into her vagina, shove a water hose into her nose and mouth. And you see the soldiers wives’ watch. You hear the soldiers forcing Sherlyn to admit who it was with plans to “write a letter.” You hear her admit, after intense torture, that it was Karen’s idea. And you see Karen, dragged out of her cell, tied at the wrists and ankles, stripped of her clothing, then beaten, water-tortured, and burned with cigarettes and raped with pieces of wood. And it is you who are ordered to wash their clothes the next day, and who finds blood in their panties.

And you are there, on the night they take away Manuel Merino, when you hear an old man moaning, a gunshot and the red light of a sudden fire.

* * *

The day Raymond Manalo and his brother Reynaldo escaped was the day he promised himself they would pay, all of them who tortured Karen and Sherlyn, who killed so many, who tortured him and his brother until they begged and pleaded. They were pigs, he says, those men were pigs. If he escaped, they told him, and if they couldn’t find him, they would massacre his family. And if they do not answer to the courts here, they will answer to God.

They can still kill him, he says. But even if they do, it is too late. He’s told his story.

 

Advertisements

Licensure Examination for Teachers, 2008

November 17, 2008

The long wait is over. Actually, the waiting is not that long. The usual release date of LET passers is in September. PRC has released the 2008 result just this month. I wonder what took the officials so long. Is your alma mater included in the list of Top Performing School? Or worse, your name is not in the list.


A total of 17,816 elementary teachers out of 58,471 examinees and 18,801 secondary teachers out of 53,195 examinees have successfully passed the Licensure Examination for Teachers given by the Board of Professional Teachers in September this year, which was conducted in 24 testing centers all over the Philippines.

The Topnotchers

Elementary level


Rank

Name

School

Rating

1

Elisse Adrianne Hilario Regala

Philippine Normal University-Manila

91.8

2

Rudolf Tamangen Vecaldo

Cagayan State University-Tuguegarao

91.6

3

Melisande Cabacungan Juan

University of the Philippines-Diliman

91

4

John Wilbert Raymundo Aretaño

Polytechnic State College Of Antique

90.4

5

Sheilamarie Cabugon Cachero

Mariano Marcos State University-Laoag-Coll. of Education

90.2

 

Iris Culanculan Duhaylongsod

University of the Philippines-Diliman

90.2

6

Roderick De La Cruz Marbella

Philippine Normal University-Lopez

90

7

Dorothy Joann Lei Osog Labrador

Ateneo De Zamboanga

89.8

 

Estefanie Salcedo Vargas

Ateneo De Naga

89.8

8

Richelle Alday Steigerwald

University of the Philippines-Diliman

89.4

9

Princes Raymunda Guzman Gatan

National Teacher’s College

89.2

10

Catherine Gimang Capilla

Negros Oriental State University (Cvpc)-Dumaguete

89

Secondary level


Rank

Name

School

Rating

1

Ma. Cleofe Nicolas Tabangin

University of the Philippines-Los Baños

92.2

2

Romina Ann Soon Yap

Ateneo De Manila University-Q.C.

91.8

3

Angela Dimalanta Carreon

University of the Philippines-Diliman

91.6

4

Maria Elena Fermin Ferrer

University of Santo Tomas

91.2

5

Johnny Abellera Esmilla Jr.

University of San Agustin

91

 

Lucille Virtudazo Gandionco

University of San Carlos

91

6

Tony Dane Bugarin Quetulio

Ateneo De Manila University-Q.C.

90.4

 

Maria Nenita Silang Se

Philippine Normal University-Manila

90.4

7

Ariel Dangcalan Co

University of Santo Tomas

90.2

8

Ryan Oliver Dañganan Bautista

University of the Philippines-Manila

90

 

Carl Jestoni Bariquit Dakay

University of San Carlos

90

 

Elexor Torres Damasco

University of The Cordilleras (Baguio Coll. Fndtn.)

90

 

Audie Dacumos Laudencia

Philippine Normal University-Manila

90

 

Felizardo Nicodemus Pulumbarit Jr.

University of the Philippines-Diliman

90

9

Oliver Vallejo Aromin

Mindanao State University-Marawi City

89.8

 

Miren Amale Mendezona Jopson

Ateneo De Manila University-Q.C.

89.8

 

Rochell Casia Miguel

Philippine Normal University-Manila

89.8

10

Pamela Cristina Parciso Crisostomo-Tumang

University of the Philippines-Manila

89.6

 

Israel Cruz Cruz

University of Santo Tomas

89.6

 

Von Ryan Gasmeña Pangwi

University of Baguio

89.6

  

The list of Top performing schools (with at least 50.00% passing percentage) in the September 2008 L.E.T. Exam Results released by PRC.

Top Performing Schools in the September 2008 L.E.T. Exam Results are the following:

Elementary level
Category A: With 10-99 examinees

 

Elementary level
Category A: With 10-99 examinees


Rank

School

Number Of Examinees

Total No.Passed

% passed

1

Assumption College – Makati

11

11

100.00%

 

Saint Theresa’s College – Cebu

14

14

100.00%

 

University of Rizal System – Antipolo

13

13

100.00%

 

University of Santo Tomas

41

41

100.00%

 

University of The Philippines – Diliman

73

73

100.00%

2

Mindanao State University – Iligan Institute of Technology

65

63

97.00%

3

Saint Louis University

54

52

96.00%

 

University Of Saint La Salle

28

27

96.00%

 

Category B: With 100 – 299 examinees


Rank

School

Number Of Examinees

Total No.Passed

% passed

1

Xavier University

126

118

94.00%

2

West Visayas State University – La Paz

213

184

86.00%

3

University of Southeastern Philippines – Tagum

123

102

83.00%

Category C: With 300 – 499 examinees


Rank

School

Number Of Examinees

Total No.Passed

% passed

1

Philippine Normal University – Manila

302

267

88.00%

2

Cebu Normal University (Cebu State College)

312

238

76.00%

3

Benguet State University – La Trinidad

301

193

64.00%

Secondary Level

Category A: With 10-99 examinees


Rank

School

Number Of Examinees

Total No.Passed

% passed

1

Ateneo De Manila University – Q.C.

42

42

100.00%

 

Miriam College (Maryknoll College Foundation, Inc.)

26

26

100.00%

 

University of Asia & The Pacific – Pasig

12

12

100.00%

 

University of the Philippines – Baguio City

37

37

100.00%

 

University of the Philippines – Manila

21

21

100.00%

 

University of the Philippines – Visayas – Tacloban City

11

11

100.00%

2

University of the Philippines – Visayas – Iloilo City

40

39

98.00%

3

Assumption College – Makati

26

25

96.00%

 

University of the Philippines – Los Baños

78

75

96.00%

Category B: With 100 – 299 examinees


Rank

School

Number Of Examinees

Total No.Passed

% passed

1

University of the Philippines – Diliman

209

206

99.00%

2

University of Santo Tomas

288

264

92.00%

3

Saint Louis University

208

183

88.00%

Category C: With 300 – 499 examinees


Rank

School

Number Of Examinees

Total No.Passed

% passed

1

West Visayas State University – La Paz

360

242

67.00%

2

Mindanao State University – Iligan Institute Of Technology

330

216

65.00%

3

Bicol University – Legazpi

332

200

60.00%

Category D: With 500 or more examinees


Rank

School

Number Of Examinees

Total No.Passed

% passed

1

Philippines Normal University – Manila

664

587

88.00%

2

Cebu Normal University (Cebu State College)

518

338

65.00%

3

Polytechnic University of the Philippines – Main – Sta. Mesa

577

344

60.00%

Data taken from www.philippinetopschools.com

For the complete list of board passers from A-Z, click this link www.mapiles.com

 

Medical Mission for our fellow Aetas and Abelling

November 5, 2008
On November 15-16, 2008, the UP Outdoor Recreation Group (UP ORG) will be conducting medical, dental and feeding mission in Tarlac Eco-camp, Lubigan, San Jose, Tarlac. The recipients of this two-day mission are the Aeta of Baag and the Abelling tribe of San Pedro.
 
Please support this mission and help our indigenous brothers and sisters by donating one kind in the food items and one in the medicine items:
 
FOOD LIST:
1) 10 kgs RICE
2) 20 cans of CORNEDBEEF;
3) 20 cans of TUNA;
4) 30 cans of SARDINES;
5) 50 pcs INSTANT NOODLES;
6) 50 pcs PANCIT CANTON; and
7) 15 packs of individually wrapped BISCUITS/ CUPCAKE/BREAD
 
MEDICINE LIST:
 
(For COLDS, COUGH, and FLU)
1) 100 pcs Ambroxol Tab;
2) 100 pcs Bromhexine HCL Tab;
3) 100 pcs CARBOCISTEINE Cap;
4) 100 pcs GUAIFENESIN Cap;
5) 100 pcs PARACETAMOL+ PHENYLEPRINE+CHLORPHENIRAMINE (coldzep);
6) 100 pcs AMOXICILLIN Cap;
7) 100 pcs LAGUNDI Tap;
 
(for hyperacidity/ulcer)
8) 100 pcs ANTACID Tab;
9) 100 pcs RANITIDINE Tab;
10)100 pcs OMEPRAZOLE;
 
(for amoebiasis)
11) 100 pcs METRONIDAZOLE Tab;
 
(bulate/pampurga)
12)100 pcs MEBENDAZOLE Tab;
 
(for diarrhea)
13)100 pcs HYDRITE Tab;
 
(laxative/for constipation)
14)100 pcs BISACODYL Tab;
 
(for ASTHMA)
15) 100 pcs SALBUTAMOL Tab;
16) 100 pcs SALBUTAMOL+GUAIFENESIN Cap;
 
(for UTI)
17)100 pcs CIPROFLOXACIN;
 
(allergies)
18)100 pcs CHLORPHERAMINE Tab;
 
(other antibiotics)
19)100 pcs AMPICILLIN Cap;
20)100 pcs CEFALEXIN Cap;
 
(vitamins)
21) 100 pcs FEROUS SULFATE;
22) 100 pcs MULTIVITAMINS+MINERAL Tab;
 
(pain reliever)
23) 100 pcs MEFENAMIC Cap;
24) 100 pcs PARACETAMOL Tab;
 
You can also donate other medicines which you think are needed for this type of mission. Please drop your donations at Sefali Restaurant in Krus na Ligas, UP Diliman, Quezon City on November 5, 6, 7, 10, and 11 from 8pm to 10:30pm. For further inquiries, pls dont hesitate to contact 0919-8291139 / 0915-6455088 or you may reply to this post.
SALAMAT PO!

Oldies but goodies

November 4, 2008

These are my super vintage Converse shoes. They are more or less 7 years old. My brother handed them to me after a year. I am the youngest in the family hence the hand-me down tradition is on my shoulders.  If my memory serves me right, they’ve been serving me for 6 years now.

7 years old

7 years old

 

When will I be washed?

 

My friends and officemates get mortified whenever they see me on these shoes. However, I have met a few foreigners who actually find my Chuck Taylor cool. I am still not planning to wash them. I have this fascination with old, rusty things and History. Once, my sister wanted to wash these antiquated footwear, but I hid them.  

The answer is “No, you will not be washed.”

Instead, I bought a new pair!

Orange anyone?

Orange anyone?

 

So, how old are yours?